Tag Archives: Retail

Omnipresent Approach to Next Generation Retail

Did you know that *over $272,000 is spent online every minute and **72% of people are influenced socially through ratings, reviews and recommendations? Shopping behavior has changed significantly due to the multitude of online channels with information that is easily accessible to consumers to help make smart purchase decisions. Traditionally purchase decisions were influenced through advertisements and promotions directly from the brand owner or retailer. This trend is changing significantly and today’s shoppers increasingly leverage information from multiple online channels provided through mobile devices and social networks to enrich their shopping experience.

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Point of Sale – The Change Agent for Retail Evolution

We’ve talked a lot about how the retail industry is going through a transformation in this blog. The consumer, and their desire to make informed purchase decisions are driving most of this change.  As retailers begin to adapt to the connected consumer, many of their systems will begin to change in order to support the experience the consumer is demanding. The one system change that will likely take the lead in this change is the Point of Sale (POS).

Retail stores are doing everything they can to entice consumers to visit their location, and forego shopping online. The theory is that a superb in-store experience, combined with instant fulfillment, will make even the savviest connected consumer spend more time and money in the store.  For this to happen however, there is a bar for convenience that has been set by the e-commerce industry that must be matched – checkout.

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Shopping Bags

The Next Great Transformation in Retail

digital shoppingThe Harvard Business Review ran a great blog post: The Future of Shopping. The post pointed out that every 50 years or so, retail undergoes a major transformation.

digital shoppingEvery 50 years or so, retailing undergoes this kind of disruption. A century and a half ago, the growth of big cities and the rise of railroad networks made possible the modern department store. Mass-produced automobiles came along 50 years later, and soon shopping malls lined with specialty retailers were dotting the newly forming suburbs and challenging the city-based department stores. The 1960s and 1970s saw the spread of discount chains—Walmart, Kmart, and the like—and, soon after, big-box “category killers” such as Circuit City and Home Depot, all of them undermining or transforming the old-style mall. Each wave of change doesn’t eliminate what came before it, but it reshapes the landscape and redefines consumer expectations, often beyond recognition. Continue reading